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Posts Tagged ‘Real Estate’

RBA says No Housing Crisis Here

Posted by Tamara McDowell on June 9, 2010

Speaking on recent developments in the housing market the RBA’s Head of Financial Stability, Luci Ellis recently stated that any housing collapse like that seen in the US at the start of the global financial crisis is unlikely to occur in Australia.

Ellis notes that if the current benign picture of the financing of the housing market is to continue it is crucial that lending standards in the mortgage market remain prudent.

“Past experience has clearly shown that in the long run, you don’t improve housing affordability by easing lending standards. That just gets capitalised in the price.

“In fact, easing mortgage lending standards too far can be outright damaging to long-run affordability. This has been amply demonstrated in the recent United States housing meltdown,” Ellis said.

In Australia, lending standards never eased that far, and conditions didn’t get that grim.

Ellis notes that first-home buyers have long faced greater risk than more established home owners who have more equity in their homes. She states that there appears to have not been a drop in lending standards to first-time buyers, even when the First Home Owners Boost was in effect.

“Indeed, across the mortgage market as a whole, lending standards are a little tighter than they were a couple of years ago,” says Ellis.

In summary Ellis said that the global economic slump may still have a way to go and with consumer confidence still low financial conditions could remain tight for several years.

Mortgage holders should expect then, that current lending criteria will remain in force – which generally means borrowers will be required to provide a minimum deposit of  5 per cent as well as provide evidence that genuine savings forms part of that deposit.

Borrowers who require assistance finding a home loan, or who are looking for a low deposit option, should talk to a good mortgage broker for assistance.

Posted in Bank & Lender News, House Prices, Interest Rates, Loans, Mortgage Broker Service, Real Estate News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Perth median to break through $500,000

Posted by Tamara McDowell on April 6, 2010

 

The resources juggernaut is fuelling the next Perth property boom, with the city’s housing markets unable to absorb WA’s continuing massive population growth.

According to the Real Estate Institute of WA (REIWA), growing confidence has led to an increase in listings as well as sales. At the end of March, there were 12,700 properties on the market – an increase of 22% from December.

“The Perth median house price is very likely to top $500,000 for the first time when official figures are released in early May,” said REIWA president Alan Bourke.

The busiest sector during the March quarter was the $500–600,000 range. “Here, the proportion of sales jumped 2.5 percentage points to represent about 18% of the market,” Bourke said. “The other price range to show increased activity for the quarter was in the $750,000 to $1m range.”

By contrast, sales of homes under $400,000 are beginning to subside.

Posted in House Prices, Investors, Real Estate News | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Buyers opt for higher priced properties as confidence returns

Posted by Tamara McDowell on March 29, 2010

A growing number of property buyers are snapping up more expensive properties in capital cities amid predictions that value will double over the next 10 years.

The latest data from Loan Market showed mortgage demand from borrowers buying top end properties jumped by 30% over the past 12 months. The report also found a dramatic increase in borrowers seeking loans in excess of $800,000 and those who are borrowing more than $3 million.

“There is strong evidence that the prestige property market is on the move and people are on the hunt for homes worth more than $1 million,” said Dean Rushton, Loan Market chief operating officer. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in House Prices, Investors, Real Estate News | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Property Investment…New or Old?

Posted by Tamara McDowell on March 27, 2010

 

Property investment is not just about whether you decide to buy a unit or a house, you also have the option of new or old.

There are advantages for both styles of properties, and it really comes down to your short and long term objectives. Where you intend to purchase the property will also influence what type of properties are available in a particular geographic location.

Purchasing a property off-the-plan – which allows you to lock in today’s prices for a property that may be finished in a year or two in the future – can be an effective investment strategy as you will not have to make any mortgage repayments until the property is ready for habitation. The only cost will be the deposit.

The key potential pitfall with an off-the-plan purchase is that there is no guarantee that the property you buy today will have grown or even maintained its value. The downside of this is that your lender may not be willing to fund the entire purchase price, which will leave you with a shortfall.

There are also pros and cons associated with the purchase of an existing property. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Investors | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Interest Rate Rises Inevitable

Posted by Tamara McDowell on March 26, 2010

Australian interest rates will continue to rise to more normal levels despite global jitters as holding off with increases risks falling behind on inflation, according to a top central banker.

Meanwhile Businessspectator reported RBA assistant governor Philip Lowe as also issuing the clearest warning yet against a speculative bubble in home prices, while welcoming a higher local dollar as part of boom in the country’s terms of trade. 

The Australian dollar duly rallied after his speech while bill futures slid as investors revised up the chance of a rise in the cash rate as early as next month. 

“The RBA remains very upbeat and that means a rate hike in April is more likely than not,” said Rory Robertson, interest rates strategist at Macquarie. 

The central bank has already lifted rates by a full percentage point in six months and the market was now implying a 57% probability of a move to 4.25% at the next policy meeting on April 6.  Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Bank & Lender News, Interest Rates | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Negative Gearing………..

Posted by Tamara McDowell on February 27, 2010

About negative gearing

If you’ve got money to invest, an option you may consider is negative gearing.

With correct financial advice and with the selection of the right property, negative gearing can provide great tax advantages. That’s great if you’re thinking about entering the property investment market for the first time or want to increase your investment portfolio.

How do you negative gear a property?

A property is negatively geared when the costs of owning it – interest on the loan, bank charges, maintenance, repairs and capital depreciation – exceed the income it produces.

Put simply, your investment must make a loss before you can claim a tax benefit.

It works not only for property, but also shares and bonds. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Investors, Loans, Mortgage Broker Service | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Equity

Posted by Tamara McDowell on February 27, 2010

What is equity?

Equity is the difference between what your home is worth and how much you owe on it.

For example, if your home is worth $300,000 and you owe $100,000, you have $200,000 in equity. Over time, as you reduce the amount you owe on your home or the value of your home grows, your equity increases. It’s that simple.

Using equity to build wealth through property investment

Unlocking the equity in your home can be an effective way to assist in purchasing a rental property to help build your wealth. Residential investment properties can be a popular investment, having the potential to provide investment security, capital growth and rental income. There may also be tax advantages. Negative gearing and depreciation allowances are also popular ways to reduce your tax liability, especially at the end of the financial year. You should consult your financial and taxation advisers before determining if this strategy suits you.

If you haven’t already invested in property, making a start may be easier and more achievable than you think. The key factor is getting the right advice to help ensure you make the right decision about your loan.

What if I’m still paying off my home?

Provided you have substantial equity in your home, you may be able to release funds to start investing sooner. Remember, it’s not just about reducing the amount you owe on your home that increases your equity, if the value of your home has risen since you bought it, your equity is likely to have increased.

What can I use my equity for?

Depending on your financial circumstances, and the advice you receive from your financial advisor, you can use your equity for a wide range of purposes like a new car or renovations. You may choose to create or build an investment portfolio or to enhance your lifestyle. There are many possibilities, it’s really up to you.

By unlocking your equity you may be able to access a whole range of opportunities sooner. If you’ve been putting off that small home renovation or investment strategy until you’ve saved enough capital, unlocking your home equity can allow you to start improving your lifestyle right now.

Posted in Investors, Mortgage Broker Service | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Basic Buying Process

Posted by Tamara McDowell on February 27, 2010

Make an offer

If you are buying at an auction, you are required to pay a deposit (usually 10% of the purchase price) immediately.

If you are buying privately, you are usually required to pay a holding deposit (can be anywhere between $1,000, $2,000 and 10% of the purchase price).

Contract of sale/Offer and Acceptance

The Contract of Sale/Offer & Acceptance, prepared by the agent or by the vendor’s (the current owner of the property) solicitor, outlines your offer, the date of settlement and any conditions that must be met before the sale goes ahead. Discuss the Contract of Sale with your solicitor before you sign it. There are two kinds of offers – unconditional and conditional.

Unconditional offers

This is an outright offer to buy the property. You should be 100% sure that this is the property you want and that you have access to the money to buy the property. Once the vendor has accepted your offer, you are legally obliged to go through with the sale.

Conditional offers

A conditional offer is also a binding contract, provided that all your conditions are satisfied. You can only back out now if one or more of your conditions are not met. Conditions may include:

  • subject to valuation – the sale will only go ahead if the valuation is acceptable to both you and your bank.
  • subject to finance – the sale will only go ahead if your bank approves your finance.
  • subject to acceptable title search – the sale will only go ahead if there are no ownership, access or other claims recorded on the property title. Your solicitor/settlement agent will do this for you.
  • subject to an acceptable builder’s or engineer’s report – the sale will only go ahead if you are satisfied that the house, or land it is on, is sound.

You may wish to set other conditions eg subject to certain repairs being carried out, white ant inspection etc. Talk to your solicitor/settlement agent or real estate agent about anything you are unhappy or unsure about. Don’t sign your Contract of Sale/Offer & Acceptance until you are happy with the conditions.

Negotiation, acceptance and deposit

The vendor may accept your offer straight away or may negotiate on the price or other aspects of the sale. The real estate agent will act as the ‘go-between’ until you and the vendor reach a happy medium. If you cannot agree on a price, you can withdraw your offer.  Once both you and the vendor have signed the agreement, it is legally binding.

You will normally be expected to pay your deposit directly to the real estate agent on signing the agreement. It will be placed in a trust account until all conditions have been met.

Finalise loan

The Contract of Sale/Offer & Acceptance will usually state the length of time you have for finance.

It is a good idea to have already had your finance approved in principle/ pre-approved.

If you haven’t, you have two choices – You can go to the Bank/Lender directly or you can use a Mortgage Broker.

If you have obtained a pre-approval  the process should be quick and smooth and you would have already supplied the required documents.

Settlement

The contract of sale/Offer & Acceptance will state the amount of time you have to settle the conditions. When all conditions are met, the offer becomes unconditional, the sale will go ahead and the property will be yours.

How the settlement process works

  • Your solicitor/conveyancer/settlement agent will prepare and arrange for you to sign a transfer of land document. You should ensure that this is done at least two weeks prior to the settlement date. This document will be handed over at settlement to the Lender/Bank. The Lender/Bank will register it at the State/Territory’s Title Office on your behalf. Upon registration, the property will be changed over to your name.
  • Your solicitor/conveyancer/settlement agent will contact the Bank/Lender, the seller’s solicitor/conveyancer/settlement agent and other interested parties to arrange the date, place and time of settlement.
  • Your solicitor/conveyancer/settlement agent should advise you, one week prior to the settlement, of the exact date and time of settlement and the amount of funds that you are required to provide prior to settlement (if applicable). This amount is usually required to be paid by bank cheque one day before settlement.
  • After settlement has taken place the seller’s solicitors/settlement agent will contact the real estate agent that sold you the property and advise them to hand over the keys to the property to you.
  • Your solicitor/settlement agent should contact you and confirm settlement has taken place. They will also send you a statement of adjustment to show you how the funds have been disbursed to the parties involved.

Congratulations!!!  ……….You will have purchased your Home!!!

Posted in First Home Owners, Loans, Mortgage Broker Service | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Property Prices over the Last Decade

Posted by Tamara McDowell on February 11, 2010

Across the capital city residential property market, the last 10 years has seen home values almost double with an annual rate of growth of 9.4%. Today the capital city median dwelling price across the country sits at $451,000 with houses recording a median of $485,000 and units at $400,000. If you bought a home 10 years ago, you were probably looking at a median price of less than $200,000 for either property type.

As the capital city market pricing graph shows, there has been distinctive periods of growth during the last decade. Between 2000 and 2003 there was a strong growth period which was following a long period of negligible value growth. Following this boom, values nationally showed little growth again until 2007.

In fact, the majority of value growth recorded between 2004 and 2007 was due to the Perth market which was undergoing a significant surge in values due to unprecedented strength in the mining and resources sector. Read the rest of this entry »

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